Here’s how she’s giving back and looking good while doing it.

By Lisa DeSantis
October 02, 2019
Qeep Up

You may recognize actress Maggie Q from the many television shows and movies she has starred in, but perhaps her greatest role is as an activist. A self-proclaimed nature lover, animal rescuer, and health nut, Q is using her platform to call attention to her two passions: fitness and sustainability. We caught up with her to get the details about her new athleisure line, Qeep Up, along with her healthy habits.

On living healthy

What does living healthy mean to her? “It’s everything,” says Q. “It’s not just using one healthy thing during the day; staying healthy means you have to hit it from all sides. I exercise, I eat right, I meditate, I spend time with rescue animals. It’s mind, body, and soul.” One way she makes sure that she gets a daily workout is by hiking with her rescue dogs. They've become her alarm clock—waking up in the morning ready to hit the hills, so Q has no excuse not to get moving in the a.m.

Qeep Up

On her go-to healthy eats

Q makes sure to consume plenty of vegetables, but she happily enjoys animal foods on occasion. “I incorporate eggs and other things," she says. "My friends have their own chickens, so that lifestyle I am fine with.” She also shares her favorite recipe with us: kitchari. Q explains it as a three-day reset and is a fan because it’s “not juicing; you’re eating food and you feel so good.”

On what self-care means to her

“Right now, I have no idea what it means,” admits Q, blaming her busy schedule for not doing more self-care activities. Not only did she just launch Qeep Up, but she’s also working on three acting projects. Yet Q adds that “the hustle is finite,” meaning she knows that what she’s doing right now requires all of her attention—but she’s reveling in it.

Qeep Up

On the importance of sustainable fashion

Q dreamed of starting her own line for 10 years, but she knew now was the time because the technology is finally where it needs to be. “If you’re going to do a recycled garment, you have to do it at a level of quality that’s offered on the market in a non-recycled version,” she explains. “Everything kind of beautifully dovetailed: technology is there, oceans are a really hot topic right now because of social media and the pictures we’re seeing, and [there's more] science about oceans and pollution. So I think the timing just lined up.”

On the inspiration behind her athleisure line

“I wanted to do a line that was cute enough to wear if you wanted to walk out of spin class and have lunch,” says Q of Qeep Up. She looked to designers like Rick Owens and focused more on the shape of garments than anything else, taking into account which fashion elements could actually be practical during a workout. The result? Pieces that are practical but also offer an elevated aesthetic. Expect to find solid and printed, luxe-feeling fabrics in colors like hunter green and navy blue with designs like overalls and even a trench.

Qeep Up

On her favorite piece in the collection

“I love our onesies. [The Sweetheart Bodysuit ($165; qeepupnation.com)] I think it’s hard to do a onesie that all women look good in, but everyone looks sexy in them.” This piece in particular has strategically placed mesh inserts and a sweetheart neckline. “It follows the body beautifully,” she says.

On the give-back component of Qeep Up

The yarns in the clothes are entirely made from recycled plastic waste, and the "Ocean Tie-Dye Print" pieces have a charitable component. A portion of the sales of those items—which include tops like The Essential Mini Tank ($78; qeepupnation.com), bottoms like High Ball Legging ($125; qeepupnation.com) and even swimwear like The Magnet One Piece ($128; qeepupnation.com)—goes to Blue Sphere Foundation. The group's mission is to protect the oceans, especially marine species and habitats that are in danger. “We want people to say, oh its cute, and you know what else it’s cute and it’s also offsetting our carbon footprint and reusing post-industrial waste,” Q says about the initiative.

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